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Справка Scilab >> Optimization and Simulation > Optimization base > optimbase_function

optimbase_function

Calls cost function.

Syntax

[opt, f, index] = optimbase_function(opt, x, index)
[opt, f, c, index] = optimbase_function(opt, x, index)
[opt, f, g, index] = optimbase_function(opt, x, index)
[opt, f, g, c, gc, index] = optimbase_function(opt, x, index)

Argument

opt

The object of TOPTIM type (tlist). (INPUT/OUTPUT)

x

A column vector of doubles, the current point.

index

An integer. (INPUT/OUTPUT)

The index input parameter has the following meaning.

  • index = 1: nothing is to be computed, the user may display messages, for example.

  • index = 2: compute f.

  • index = 3: compute g.

  • index = 4: compute f and g.

  • index = 5: compute c.

  • index = 6: compute f and c.

  • index = 7: compute f, g, c and gc.

The index output parameter has the following meaning .

  • index > 0: everything is fine.

  • index = 0: the optimization must stop.

  • index < 0: one function could not be evaluated.

f

Scalar. The value of the cost function.

g

Row matrix of doubles. The gradient of the cost function.

c

Row matrix of doubles. The non-linear, positive, inequality constraints.

gc

Matrix of doubles. The gradient of the non-linear, positive, inequality constraints.

Description

The optimbase_function function calls the cost function and return the required results. If a cost function additional argument is defined in current object, it is passed it to the function as the last argument.

The -function() option allows to configure the cost function. The cost function is used, depending on the context, to compute the cost, the non-linear inequality positive constraints, the gradient of the function and the gradient of the non-linear inequality constraints.

The cost function can also be used to produce outputs and to terminate an optimization algorithm.

Each syntax of the optimbase_function function corresponds to a specific syntax of the user-provided cost function.

  • If the -withderivatives is false and there is no non-linear constraint, the syntax is

    [ this , f , index ] = optimbase_function ( this , x , index )

    which corresponds to the cost functions:

    [f , index ] = costf( x , index )
  • If the -withderivatives is false and there are non-linear constraints, the syntax is

    [ this , f , c , index ] = optimbase_function ( this , x , index )

    which corresponds to the cost functions:

    [f , c , index ] = costf( x , index )
  • If the -withderivatives is true and there is no non-linear constraint, the syntax is

    [ this , f , g , index ] = optimbase_function ( this , x , index )

    which corresponds to the cost functions:

    [f , g , index ] = costf( x , index )
  • If the -withderivatives is true and there are non-linear constraints, the syntax is

    [ this , f , g , c , gc , index ] = optimbase_function ( this , x , index )

    which corresponds to the cost functions:

    [f , g , c , gc , index ] = costf( x , index )

Each syntax corresponds to a particular class of algorithms, including for example

  • unconstrained, derivative-free algorithms,

  • unconstrained constrained, derivative-free algorithms,

  • unconstrained, derivative-based algorithms,

  • nonlinearly constrained, derivative-based algorithms,

  • etc.

It might happen that the function requires additional arguments to be evaluated. In this case, we can use the following feature. The argument fun can also be the list (f, a1, a2, ...). In this case f, the first element in the list, must bea function and must have the header:

[ f , index ] = f ( x , index , a1 , a2 , ... )
[ f , c , index ] = f ( x , index , a1 , a2 , ... )
[ f , g , index ] = f ( x , index , a1 , a2 , ... )
[ f , g , c , gc , index ] = f ( x , index , a1 , a2 , ... )

where the input arguments a1, a2, ... are automatically appended as parameters to the call.

Example : Setting up an optimization

In the following example, one searches the minimum of the 2D Rosenbrock function. One begins by defining the function "rosenbrock" which computes the Rosenbrock function. The traditional initial guess [-1.2 1.0] is used. The initial simplex is computed along the axes with a length equal to 0.1. The Nelder-Mead algorithm with variable simplex size is used. The verbose mode is enabled so that messages are generated during the algorithm. After the optimization is performed, the optimum is retrieved with query features.

function [f, index]=rosenbrock(x, index)
f = 100*(x(2)-x(1)^2)^2 + (1-x(1))^2;
endfunction

opt = optimbase_new();
opt = optimbase_configure(opt,"-numberofvariables",2);
nbvar = optimbase_cget(opt,"-numberofvariables");
opt = optimbase_configure(opt,"-function",rosenbrock);
[ opt , f , index ] = optimbase_function ( opt , [0.0 0.0] , 1 );
expectedf = 1
disp(f)
opt = optimbase_destroy(opt);

Example : Passing extra parameters

In the following example, we consider a function which has two additional parameters a and b. In this case, we can configure the "-function" option as a list, where the first element is the function and the two extra arguments are located at the end of the list.

function [f, index]=rosenbrock2(x, index, a, b)
f = a*(x(2)-x(1)^2)^2 + (b-x(1))^2;
endfunction

opt = optimbase_new();
opt = optimbase_configure(opt,"-numberofvariables",2);
nbvar = optimbase_cget(opt,"-numberofvariables");
a = 100;
b = 1;
opt = optimbase_configure(opt,"-function",list(rosenbrock2,a,b));
[ opt , f , index ] = optimbase_function ( opt , [0.0 0.0] , 1 );
expectedf = 1
disp(f)
opt = optimbase_destroy(opt);

See also

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Last updated:
Tue Feb 14 15:13:25 CET 2017